Bookmarks for 2005-03-12

Grabbed from my furl.

Rated 4
Jared Diamond, author of the fascinating new book “Collapse,” which shows how some civilizations in effect committed suicide by plundering their environments, says false alarms aren’t a bad thing. Professor Diamond argues that if we accept false alarms for fires, then why not for the health of our planet? But environmental alarms have been screeching for so long that, like car alarms, they are now just an irritating background noise.
Rated 4
I blame parents. Kids are raised amid foam corner protectors and schooled amid flame-retardant construction paper. They’re drugged with a vast array of pharmaceuticals to keep them from becoming interesting.
Rated 3
The notice read: “Tim Burton’s garage sale.”
Rated 3
The last explanation is the most convincing, given Dre’s Midas touch in recent years. At the ancient age of 40, the former Andre Young finally has his hitmaking formula down to a science—just plug in a new rapper and clear some wall space for the platinum records. The Documentary is Dre’s fourth major triumph since founding Aftermath Entertainment in 1996: Before The Game, it was 50 Cent, and before 50 Cent it was Eminem and Dre’s own comeback album, 1999’s 2001. How did Dre become hip-hop’s most reliable kingmaker?
Rated 4
while I agree with this thesis, I’d like to see some counter-analysis.
Rated 2
Rated 3
And here’s one of my favorite shows from the archives. While we’re building great new tools to build communities, we’ve done very little to ensure that people around the world have access to them. And even when we’ve made it possible for people in developing nations to speak, we’ve done little to ensure that anyone listens. How do we ensure that the “Second Superpower” Jim Moore proposes includes the poor as well as the rich? When a new democratic structure emerges from highly-wired westerners, how do we ensure it’s fair and just for those currently unwired? The answer is more complex than bridging the so-called “digital divide” – it involves bridging countless cultural divides. Emerging technologies make it easier than ever to bringfirst-person perspectives, as well as images, movies and music to people in other nations – is this enough to bring cultures together and ensure they care about one another?
Rated 3
Dr. Moira Gunn speaks with Tim Cook, managing director of Isis Innovation. Tim tells us how university scientists view industry, and vice-versa.
Rated 3
Moira also speaks with Sir Roger Penrose, Emeritus Professor of Mathmatics, Oxford University. He shares the Wolf Prize with Stephen Hawking. They discuss his new book, Road to Reality — Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe.
Rated 4
How do you establish trust between between strangers on the Internet? Identity federation is one way to create a community of trust, but it relies on establishing the trust domains before the interaction. That doesn’t work for many Internet transactions. In an all-new IT Conversations series, Phil Windley interviews Professor Kent Seamons who exploes in depth some specific ways of solving this problem.
Rated 5
Clark is the co-founder of SimuLearn and the author of, Simulations and the Future of Learning. He recently lead the team that created Virtual Leader, the first ever learning experience to follow the development cycle of a modern computer game. It has been sold to some of the largest enterprises in the United States.
Rated 3
The case for microbicides is backed by persuasive numbers. Heterosexual women increasingly bear the brunt of the AIDS epidemic to the tune of roughly 7,000 women and girls newly infected each day. Microbicides aren’t a cure-all, but they could do a lot of good in high-risk areas, even if just some of the people there were to use a somewhat effective microbicide some of the time. One mathematical model, which focused on Johannesburg, South Africa, predicted that if 75 percent of area residents were to use a 40-percent-effective microbicide in half of the sexual encounters in which they didn’t use condoms, the local incidence of HIV infection would drop by 9 percent. That may not sound like much, but across countries and continents, similar percentages could translate into millions of saved lives.
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